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A new clinical trial for
Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

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Contact us to learn more about SEJ:

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Contact us to learn more about SEJ.

Thank you! A Nurse study coordinator will get back to you shortly.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form

If you or someone you know has GBM, please contact Victorine.

Victorine Sikati Foko

Nurse Study Coordinator

819.777.2500 x 251

147 Blvd D'Europe, Suite 200,
Gatineau, QC J9J 0A5

call us today

Summary

Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor. 

At the present, there exists no curative treatment and standard therapy only affords a modest, though important, benefit. Immunotherapies, like those to be used in SEJ, are a promising new field of study and have already shown to have some efficacy against other types of cancer.

Clinique Neuro-Outaouais is sponsoring a clinical research trial which aims to determine whether immunotherapy is a viable treatment option for people suffering from GBM.  If you or someone you know has GBM, please contact Clinique Neuro-Outaouais in order to learn more about how this clinical trial can supplement current standard treatments.

DR. F. JACQUES|DR. G. NICHOLAS|DR. I. LORIMER, PHD

Co-Authors

FAQ

What kind of therapeutic mechanism does SEJ make use of?

An activated white blood cell can be deactivated by your body’s immune checkpoints. These inhibitory pathways are there to modulate the immune system’s response, so as to prevent collateral damage to your body. They can also be used by cancer cells to shut the white blood cells that would otherwise attack it.

GBM cells are particularly effective at doing this: they are able to secrete several systemic factors which decrease the responsiveness of the body’s immune system and its white blood cells.

SEJ will make use of checkpoint inhibitors, a new class of drug which deactivate the body’s immune checkpoints, thereby making it difficult for cancer cells to use these pathways as a mean of avoiding the immune system.

What proof is there that SEJ could benefit you?

Drugs very similar to the checkpoint inhibitors being used in SEJ, have proven to be effective against other cancers. 

Moreover, standard cancer treatments, supplemented by the checkpoint inhibitors to be used in SEJ, have proven to be effective in animal tests: the  combination of radiotherapy and checkpoint inhibitors has led, in some cases, to a  regression of established tumors in animal models.

Can I take part in standard GBM treatments while in SEJ?

Yes, SEJ is supplemental to the current treatment for GBM. Patients therefore don’t have to worry about making a choice between either treatment options.

Does anyone participating in SEJ receive a placebo?

No one participating in SEJ receives a placebo: every participant receives both the standard therapy and the research therapy.

What is my window of opportunity to participate in SEJ?

Applicants must generally be newly diagnosed. They can no longer participate in the study if they have completed standard combined chemo and radiotherapy treatments for more than 21 days. This is why we encourage newly diagnosed patients to contact Clinique Neuro-Outaouais as soon as possible.

Why take part in clinical trials?

Clinical studies often allow patients access to the latest medical treatments at no charge, long before they become available to the public. Though not all clinical studies provide measurable benefits to their participants, the results are crucial to developing new and better treatments.

What does SEJ stand for?

SEJ is an acronym for Sarah Emmanuelle and Jim.  The protocol is a testament to their courage and determination.  They continue to be an inspiration to the SEJ co-authors and to those whose lives they touched.

What happens after I complete SEJ?

SEJ will last approximately 52 weeks, after which patients will have the option of being transferred into an open label extension study or to receive the drugs used during SEJ via a special access program.

An activated white blood cell can be deactivated by your body’s immune checkpoints. These inhibitory pathways are there to modulate the immune system’s response, so as to prevent collateral damage to your body. They can also be used by cancer cells to shut the white blood cells that would otherwise attack it.

GBM cells are particularly effective at doing this: they are able to secrete several systemic factors which decrease the responsiveness of the body’s immune system and its white blood cells.

SEJ will make use of checkpoint inhibitors, a new class of drug which deactivate the body’s immune checkpoints, thereby making it difficult for cancer cells to use these pathways as a mean of avoiding the immune system.

Drugs very similar to the checkpoint inhibitors being used in SEJ, have proven to be effective against other cancers. 

Moreover, standard cancer treatments, supplemented by the checkpoint inhibitors to be used in SEJ, have proven to be effective in animal tests: the  combination of radiotherapy and checkpoint inhibitors has led, in some cases, to a  regression of established tumors in animal models.

Yes, SEJ is supplemental to the current treatment for GBM. Patients therefore don’t have to worry about making a choice between either treatment options.

No one participating in SEJ receives a placebo: every participant receives both the standard therapy and the research therapy.

Applicants must generally be newly diagnosed. They can no longer participate in the study if they have completed standard combined chemo and radiotherapy treatments for more than 21 days. This is why we encourage newly diagnosed patients to contact Clinique Neuro-Outaouais as soon as possible.

Clinical studies often allow patients access to the latest medical treatments at no charge, long before they become available to the public. Though not all clinical studies provide measurable benefits to their participants, the results are crucial to developing new and better treatments.

SEJ is an acronym for Sarah Emmanuelle and Jim.  The protocol is a testament to their courage and determination.  They continue to be an inspiration to the SEJ co-authors and to those whose lives they touched.

SEJ will last approximately 52 weeks, after which patients will have the option of being transferred into an open label extension study or to receive the drugs used during SEJ via a special access program.